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The Role of Trade Credit Insurance in the Construction Industry

The construction industry is one of the largest and most complex industries in the world. It involves a vast array of stakeholders, including architects, engineers, contractors, subcontractors, suppliers, and clients. With so many moving parts, it's not surprising that construction projects are subject to numerous risks, such as supply chain disruptions, project delays, and bankruptcies. One way to mitigate these risks is through trade credit insurance, which can help protect construction companies from losses due to non-payment by their customers. In this blog post, we will explore the role of trade credit insurance in the construction industry and provide examples of how it can be beneficial.


What is trade credit insurance?

Trade credit insurance is a type of insurance that protects companies from losses due to non-payment by their customers. It can cover a range of risks, such as bankruptcy, protracted default, political risks, and currency risks. The policy typically pays out a percentage of the outstanding debt owed to the insured company in the event of non-payment.


Role of trade credit insurance in the construction industry:

The construction industry is a capital-intensive business, with long lead times and significant upfront costs. Suppliers of raw materials, equipment, and labor often require payment upfront or on delivery, while construction companies typically do not receive payment until milestones are met or the project is completed. This can create a cash flow gap, leaving construction companies vulnerable to supply chain disruptions or customer insolvencies.


Trade credit insurance can play a crucial role in mitigating these risks by providing construction companies with a safety net. For example, if a supplier goes bankrupt or a client defaults on payment, the construction company can make a claim on their trade credit insurance policy to recover a portion of the outstanding debt. This can help the construction company avoid financial losses and maintain cash flow, which is essential for the continuity of the project.


Other Examples of trade credit insurance in the construction industry:

  • Supplier insolvency: A construction company orders a large quantity of steel from a supplier, paying upfront for the material. However, before the supplier can deliver the steel, they go bankrupt, leaving the construction company without the material they need to complete the project. If the construction company has trade credit insurance, they can make a claim to recover the cost of the steel and find an alternative supplier to keep the project on track.

  • Customer default: A construction company agrees to build a commercial property for a client, with payment due upon completion. However, before the project is finished, the client goes bankrupt, leaving the construction company with a significant outstanding debt. If the construction company has trade credit insurance, they can make a claim to recover a portion of the outstanding debt and avoid financial losses.

Conclusion:

The construction industry is subject to numerous risks, from supply chain disruptions to customer insolvencies. Trade credit insurance can play a crucial role in mitigating these risks, providing construction companies with a safety net to protect against financial losses. By ensuring a stable cash flow, construction companies can complete projects on time and on budget, maintaining their reputation and competitiveness in the industry.


Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog post is for general informational purposes only and should not be construed as professional advice or relied upon as a substitute for legal, financial, or other professional advice.


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